Spring Courses

Spring courses at King's are a great option for students to keep studying and continue working towards completing their degree at King's! Current students can register for Spring Courses through CrossRoad

Deadline to enroll in Spring Term 1 is April 28, 2020. The deadline for Spring Term 2 is May 19, 2020.

Spring Term 1 - beginning May 4, 2020

BUSI 490 - Commerce Internship

The internship allows students to apply in a work setting, the knowledge, tools and skills gained from a combination of theoretical and practical training in finance, management, and entrepreneurship facilitated by the Commerce program. It consists of a 160-hour internship position with either a for-profit or non-profit organization. Grading will be based on employer evaluation and student's performance on mandatory activities and reports. Mark for the course will be pass/fail. Students may complete their internships in either Winter or Spring semester only. No Fall placements will be accepted.

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CMPT 480 - Practicum I

This is a placement of 10 hours per week in a commercial, industrial or non-profit setting under the supervision of a computing professional. One of CMPT 480 and 481 must be in the non-profit sector. The intern will be expected to maintain a reflective journal and complete a summary paper.

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CMPT 481 - Practicum II

The second practicum placement. The requirements for this course are the same as for CMPT 480.

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EDUC 281 - Principles of Mathematics for Teaching

This course provides a study of foundational mathematical concepts and properties in the elementary and junior high curriculum. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding, reasoning, explaining why algorithms work, and problem solving. Topics include number systems, operations, fractional numbers, proportional reasoning, and aspects of geometry.

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EDUC 300 - Introduction to Western Educational Ideas

Students receive an introduction to philosophical and ideological issues relating to educational thought and practice within the Western intellectual tradition. The course introduces the student to both traditional and contemporary theories of education as well as current efforts to develop a Christian approach to education.

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EDUC 363 - Childhood and Adolescence

This course examines the psychology of human development and change from the prenatal period to late adolescence. Specifically, development is considered chronologically in the sequence of infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, early, middle and late adolescence. The dimensions of development to be investigated include the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, academic, moral and religious aspects.

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ENGL 214 - Writing Matters: English Literature and Academic Interpretation I

This course, along with its complement, Writing Matters: English Literature and Academic Interpretation II, builds students' skills as critical readers and writers through the discipline of English. Students learn to be sophisticated readers of literature, and to examine the assumptions and implications of a wide array of texts as well as culture. The courses develop students' sensitivity to language use and their appreciation of the relationship between form and content. Students will learn about the range of literary genres, periods, and geographic locations, as well as specific terms and devices for reading lyric poems, non-fiction, and one long work (novel or drama). Assignments will introduce stages one and two of a cumulative research paper methodology, with stages three and four completed in the complement course. Through interpretative practices, we are able to examine the literary foundations of our worldviews and look on the world, ourselves, and others anew.

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ENVS 490 - Internship

A fulltime 13-week position in the workplace, normally between years three and four. Student interns receive assistance from the Internship Program Coordinator to search for an approved placement in government, industry or nongovernment agencies (paid or non-paid) that applies their environmental skills, provides valuable work experience, and gains insight into future career opportunities. The internship is pass/fail based on grading of student performance of mandatory assignments and internship evaluations. Students are eligible for an environmental internship if they have satisfactorily completed an interview with the Director of the Environmental Studies Program to assess progress in their program of study, ascertain preparation and readiness for an internship, and evaluate ability and commitment to completion of year four of the degree program.

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PHIL 230 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to philosophy based on a reading of representative texts from the philosophical tradition. The issues connecting the texts to be read center on the nature of human being and experience.

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THEO 250 - Entering the Story: Introduction to the Bible

An exploration of the genres, storylines, themes and theological patterns within the Bible. We shall engage the biblical text both as ancient literature and as Christian scripture which reveals the truth of God, the world and humanity.

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Spring Term 2 - beginning May 25, 2020

BUSI 490 - Commerce Internship

The internship allows students to apply in a work setting, the knowledge, tools and skills gained from a combination of theoretical and practical training in finance, management, and entrepreneurship facilitated by the Commerce program. It consists of a 160-hour internship position with either a for-profit or non-profit organization. Grading will be based on employer evaluation and student's performance on mandatory activities and reports. Mark for the course will be pass/fail. Students may complete their internships in either Winter or Spring semester only. No Fall placements will be accepted.

View Course Outline

CMPT 480 - Practicum I

This is a placement of 10 hours per week in a commercial, industrial or non-profit setting under the supervision of a computing professional. One of CMPT 480 and 481 must be in the non-profit sector. The intern will be expected to maintain a reflective journal and complete a summary paper.

View Course Outline

CMPT 481 - Practicum II

The second practicum placement. The requirements for this course are the same as for CMPT 480.

View Course Outline

ENGL 215 - Writing Matters: English Literature and Academic Interpretation II

This course, along with its complement, Writing Matters: English Literature and Academic Interpretation I, builds students' skills as critical readers and writers through the discipline of English. Students learn to be sophisticated readers of literature, and to examine the assumptions and implications of a wide array of texts as well as culture. The courses develop students' sensitivity to language use and their appreciation of the relationship between form and content. Students will learn about the range of literary genres, periods, and geographic locations, as well as specific terms and devices for reading narrative poetry, short stories, and two long works (novel or drama). Building from the complement course, assignments will complete stages three and four of a cumulative research paper methodology. Through interpretative practices, we are able to examine the literary foundations of our worldviews and look on the world, ourselves, and others anew.

View Course Outline

ENVS 490 - Internship

A fulltime 13-week position in the workplace, normally between years three and four. Student interns receive assistance from the Internship Program Coordinator to search for an approved placement in government, industry or nongovernment agencies (paid or non-paid) that applies their environmental skills, provides valuable work experience, and gains insight into future career opportunities. The internship is pass/fail based on grading of student performance of mandatory assignments and internship evaluations. Students are eligible for an environmental internship if they have satisfactorily completed an interview with the Director of the Environmental Studies Program to assess progress in their program of study, ascertain preparation and readiness for an internship, and evaluate ability and commitment to completion of year four of the degree program.

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HIST 204 - World History, 1500-Present

This course introduces students to the broad contours of world history since 1500. Encounters and exchanges, as well as imperialism and state formation, are central themes. Students will also be introduced to the methods historians use to study the past and will consider Christian perspectives on the practices and understanding of history. The course will begin with European encounters with the Americas and conclude with an examination of 21st-century global challenges.

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