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Course List

CHEM 200 - Introductory Chemistry I

This course provides a general introduction to the nature and vocabulary of chemistry, followed by a survey of current chemical models of bonding, structure and reactivity. The course introduces chemistry in contexts that are important to you as a student, and to our planet. Topics include chemical stoichiometry, the gaseous, liquid and solid states, atomic and molecular structure, molecular stability and reactivity, and the electronic structure of atoms.

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CHEM 201 - Introductory Chemistry II

This course teaches students to see the connection between chemistry concepts and the way humanity uses chemistry to change the world. The course begins with a discussion of the models that chemists use to describe bonding. This is followed by a study of thermodynamic equilibria, including solubility, and acid and base chemistry. The importance of redox chemistry and thermodynamic energy are explored followed by a discussion of reaction kinetics.

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CHEM 290 - Concepts of Chemistry

A survey of fundamental concepts central to chemistry, with emphasis on demonstrating the importance of chemical phenomena to the everyday experiences of the student. Examples will be drawn from the chemistry of the environment, the marketplace and living systems.

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CHEM 310 - Analytical Chemistry I

This introduction to quantitative analytical chemistry particularly emphasizes the modern instrumental techniques of spectroscopy and chromatography important to both chemistry and biochemistry. Spectrophotometry, solvent extraction, liquid chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-chromatography, and potentiometry utilizing ion-selective electrodes are among the methods studied. An introduction to questions of precision, accuracy and sampling will also be given.

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CHEM 311 - Analytical Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 310, this course focuses on the fundamental chemistry underlying quantitative analysis. Particular emphasis is given to the response of a chemical system at equilibrium to changes in various parameters and to the proper collection and treatment of analytical data. The focus in the laboratory is on gravimetric and volumetric techniques.

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CHEM 341 - Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

This course is an introduction to inorganic chemistry. The course starts with a discussion of the origin of the elements and formation of simple molecules. The chemistry of both main group and transition metals are explored by focusing on theories of structure, bonding, and the properties of organometallic complexes and non-molecular solids. The course will pay special attention to the way inorganic chemistry is important for alternative energy and bioinorganic chemistry.

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CHEM 350 - Organic Chemistry I

The chemistry of carbon compounds. Structure-reactivity relationships, mechanism, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy are emphasized in the study of the main classes of organic compounds. Particular attention is paid to compounds of importance to biology and the chemical industry.

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CHEM 351 - Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 350.

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CHEM 370 - Energetics and Chemical Reactions

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the energetics and rates of reactions. Key topics include macroscopic thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, and kinetics.

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CHEM 371 - Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy

This course focusses on developing a quantum mechanical understanding of chemistry. Quantum mechanical models are developed and applied to help students understand rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, and bonding. The connection to quantum chemical calculations is explored. NMR spectroscopy is also discussed from a quantum mechanical perspective.

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CHEM 395 - Chemistry Seminar

A weekly seminar through the entire academic year, exploring the contexts for the discipline of chemistry, including historical, methodological, ethical and societal dimensions, as well as current chemical topics of interest in basic research, industrial and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for chemists in industrial, research and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between chemistry and society. Students, faculty and visiting speakers will give presentations. This course will meet concurrently with CHEM 495, and from time to time with BIOL 395/495. It is required for third-year chemistry majors. First and second year students are strongly encouraged to attend presentations.

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CHEM 399 - Special Topics in Chemistry

A course on a topic or figure of special interest to a member of the chemistry faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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CHEM 400 - Biochemistry I

This course is designed to introduce students to biochemistry. The focus of the lectures is on the structure and function of the chemical constituents of living organisms. The lectures cover such topics as the energetics of biochemical reactions, amino acids and peptides, protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, carbohydrates and carbohydrate metabolism.

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CHEM 401 - Biochemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHEM 400. The topics covered include electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, lipids and lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleic acids and their metabolism, photosynthesis, the chemical structure of genes and chromosomes, protein synthesis, and the structure and function of biological membranes.

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CHEM 440 - Environmental Chemistry (Atmosphere/Environmental Organic)

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of the environment and chemical toxicology. A study of chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, natural and wastewaters, and soils. Mechanisms for the introduction of pollutants to the environment and methods for the removal of pollutants are studied. The focus is on anthropogenic sources of pollutants and their speciation, transport, and interaction with natural processes.

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CHEM 441 - Environmental Chemistry (Soils/Water/Waste)

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of the environment with an emphasis on water, soil and waste. Natural and contaminated surface and ground water will be covered as well as oceans. Soil chemistry will include a discussion of the chemical and physical properties of soil and will include discussion of the fate of and transport of both inorganic and organic pollutants. Chemical aspects of the generation, fate and disposal of wastes including domestic, industrial and nuclear will also be included.

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CHEM 442 - Industrial Chemistry

An introduction to the major industrial chemical processes and chemicals. Emphasis will be given to processes and chemicals important in western Canada such as: heavy inorganic chemicals, petrochemical, forestry, agricultural, metallurgical, electronics and polymer industries. Resource persons from industrial research and development departments will participate extensively in the course and field trips to various facilities will be included.

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CHEM 445 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course explores the structure, bonding, and reactivity of main group and transition metal compounds based on an understanding of molecular symmetry and molecular orbital theory. It also introduces more detailed descriptions of the reactivity of transition metal complexes and their role in catalysis.

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CHEM 450 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

The correlation between structure and reactivity of complex organic molecules is studied through reaction mechanisms. Concepts important to theoretical organic chemistry are introduced and applied. Laboratories focus on synthetic organic chemistry and physical organic techniques. Microscale organic techniques are utilized in the laboratory, as well as computer modelling of organic structures.

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CHEM 460 - Synthesis, Purification, and Characterization

An advanced, integrated laboratory course utilizing synthetic methods from organic, inorganic and biochemistry. Students will perform a series of multi-step syntheses, followed by product purification and characterization, using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods extensively. Synthetic techniques will include solid-phase synthesis and work with air-sensitive materials.

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CHEM 494 - Senior Independent Project

In this course students conduct an independent project, designed in consultation with the instructor. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University, a cooperative project with a public agency, or a chemical literature research project. Other ventures are possible. Before the work commences, the student is required to submit a detailed proposal. Upon completion of the project, the results must be presented in the form of a paper and a seminar.

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CHEM 495 - Chemistry Seminar

A weekly seminar through the entire academic year, exploring the contexts for the discipline of chemistry, including historical, methodological, ethical and societal dimensions, as well as current chemical topics of interest in basic research, industrial and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for chemists in industrial, research and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between chemistry and society. Students, faculty and visiting speakers will give presentations. This course will meet concurrently with CHEM 395, and from time to time with BIOL 395/495. It is required for fourth-year chemistry majors. First and second year students are strongly encouraged to attend presentations.

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CHEM 497 - Senior Thesis

Independent full-year research project, carried out under the mentorship of a faculty member. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University or a cooperative project with another laboratory or agency. Upon completion of the project, the results are presented in the form of a senior thesis and a seminar. The CHEM 497 thesis research can also be carried out in a summer of full-time research work at The King's University laboratories or as an intern.

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CHEM 499 - Directed Studies In Chemistry