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BIOL 204 - Insects and Humanity

Insects are often hated, sometimes loved, but seldom ignored. These minute creatures provide a window into the complexities of the biological world. This course offers a survey of the varied habitats and peculiar habits of insects, including their competition with humans for food and fiber and their role as disease agents.

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BIOL 207 - Human Anatomy

This introductory survey course of general human morphology is designed to provide students with a systematic description of the anatomical structures of the human body. This includes gross and microscopic anatomy of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Labs include various dissections and in-depth examination of the musculoskeletal system with specific attention to the upper and lower extremities, articulations, and surface anatomy. Critical thinking and appreciation for health and disease from a gross anatomical perspective are emphasized.

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BIOL 210 - Cellular Introduction to Biology

An introduction to the structure and function of cells in organisms. Topics include the origin of life, the development of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, biological energy conversions, compartmentation of biochemical functions within the cell, inter- and intra-cellular communications. Molecular genetic analysis will be used to examine the control of cellular activities and their application in genetic engineering and biotechnology will be discussed.

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BIOL 211 - Organisms in their Environment

Organisms of all the major groups are affected by their environment and exert their influence on their environment and on each other. Topics will include a description of these relationships, of their development over time, and of theories of evolutionary development of these organisms.

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BIOL 290 - Biology Concepts and Connections

A survey of the fundamental concepts central to biology, with emphasis on equipping students to understand and respond to everyday life experiences. Examples will be drawn from the biology of health, genetics, and human interaction with the environment, and other current topics.

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BIOL 307 - Human Physiology I

A introductory study of human physiology. This course examines the human physiological systems which are the basis of normal body function and homeostasis. Topics include chemical and cellular composition of the body, genetic control, cellular respiration and metabolism, nervous system and sensory physiological function.

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BIOL 320 - Introduction to Genetics

The cellular and molecular basis of heredity. Mendelian genetics and its chromosomal basis, linkage and genetic mapping in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and changes in chromosome number will be studied. DNA as genetic material, the genetic code, replication, control of protein synthesis, the governance of gene action, and recombinant DNA techniques will receive emphasis.

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BIOL 330 - Ecology

Relationships among animals, plants and the non-living environment, energy flow, nutrient cycles, ecological succession, communities, populations; application of ecological principles to the modern world. Laboratory work focuses on using basic techniques of ecological investigation. Participation in a three-day, overnight field trip on Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the last weekend of September is required.

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BIOL 340 - Plant Diversity

A study of all the major plant groups. Representative organism of each group will be examined in terms of their anatomy, morphology, and life cycle. Classification and adaptation will receive special attention.

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BIOL 343 - Integrated Zoology

Integrated Zoology takes a systems based approach to understanding the connection between organismal form and function within a phylogenetic context. The selective pressures of a changing world and environmental conditions ensure that organisms are in continuous modification, becoming adapted to fill the endless niches found on earth through out geological time. The focus is on a comparison of body plans, morphology, and life cycles that facilitate the locomotion, reproduction, and homeostasis of organisms ranging from protozoans to the invertebrates and vertebrates. Laboratory exercises expose students to the diversity of living animals and demonstrate basic morphological specializations of representative organisms.

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BIOL 346 - General Microbiology

The organization, morphology and cell structure of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and fungi. Microbial growth and its control, aspects of medical and applied microbiology and microbial ecology are discussed. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate basic microbiological techniques as well as relevant microbial activities and functions.

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BIOL 352 - Physiology of the Vertebrates

The physiological processes, from molecular- to organism-level, that allow animals to live in their environments are examined. Systems studied include gas exchange, circulation, hematology, digestion and excretion, sensory systems, osmoregulation, thermoegulation, and control mechanisms involving the endocrine system and the nervous system (CNS, PNS, and ANS). Themes of integration and homeostasis, the maintenance of a stable internal environment are also examined. Lab exercises illustrate the experimental study of physiological mechanisms with an emphasis on human physiology.

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BIOL 362 - Ethology

An overview of the evolution, function and development of animal behavior. Evolutionary processes (e.g. selection and adaptation), physiological processes (e.g. the nervous system and behavior), the behavior of individuals (e.g. development, learning, mating), and the ecology of behavior (e.g. foraging) are discussed.

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BIOL 364 - Brain and Behavior

A study of the relation between biology and behavior in humans. Topics include mind/brain issues, brain development, genes and behavior, structure and function of the nervous system, brain disorders, biopsychology of motivated disorders, drug abuse and lateralization. Foundational issues as well as biological details will be emphasized.

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BIOL 391 - Biostatistics

An introduction to the design of experiments and analysis of data collected from field and laboratory studies in biology. Statistical software will be used extensively.

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BIOL 397 - Research Methods in Biology

Explores the contexts for the discipline of biology, including historical, methodological, ethical, and societal dimensions, as well as current biological topics of interest in basic research, industrial, and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for biologists in industrial, research, and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between biology and society. Research methods and skills in biology will be emphasized, including literature review, experimental design, scientific writing, scientific communication, and mentorship. A key requirement of each student is the preparation of a project proposal, and the review and critique of each others work. Students, faculty, and visiting speakers will give presentations. It is required by all three-year, and four-year biology majors, and is a prerequisite for conduct an undergraduate research, either a Biol 494 or Biol 497.

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BIOL 399 - Special Topics in Biology

A course on a topic or figure of special interest to a member of the biology faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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BIOL 422 - Molecular Genetics

A detailed examination of the genetic and biochemical control of cell structure and function. Topics included are:biomolecular structure and function, DNA replication and recombination, regulation of transcription and translation, genomics, and gene control in development. Special emphasis is placed on the tools of molecular genetic analysis. The laboratory work is designed to provide hands-on experience with current molecular genetics techniques.

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BIOL 423 - Molecular Cell Biology

A detailed examination of cell biology at the molecular level. Topics included are: sub-cellular organization, membrane structure and function, protein sorting and vesicular transport, cell-to-cell signaling, nerve cells, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, control of the cell cycle, cancer, and immunity.

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BIOL 434 - Population Ecology

The principles of population ecology in plants and animals including: the population consequences of variation among individuals; habitat and population structure; habitat selection and foraging theory. Exploration of demographic tools for population dynamics (life tables and other models), the evolution of life histories, population dynamics, and population regulation through organism interactions (competition, predation, mutualisms).

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BIOL 436 - Conservation Biology

A discussion of the principles of conservation biology with applications to sustainable human society and biosphere integrity. This course develops the theoretical and applied basis for maintaining plant and animal populations considered endangered, threatened or at risk. It explores the complex factors contributing to the decline, extinction, or recovery of species. The course develops a stewardship perspective rooted in biological principles, and ethical, historical and economic considerations. Local, regional and global conservation strategies are discussed.

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BIOL 438 - Plant Ecology

Topics covered in Plant Ecology include ecophysiology, population biology, the structure and dynamics of plant communities, ecosystems, and landscapes, and climate and vegetative interactions, Field methods and analysis techniques for studying plant ecology will be covered.

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BIOL 466 - Evolution, Genes and Behavior

This course examines how evolutionary psychology and behavior genetics can illuminate our embodied nature, and explores the strengths, limitations and implications of these approaches for understanding the human cycle. This course also examines how research and theorizing in these two areas are influencing culture, via the media.

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BIOL 470 - Biochemistry I

This course is designed to introduce students to biochemistry. The focus of the lectures is on the structure and function of the chemical constituents of living organisms. The lectures cover such topics as the energetics of biochemical reactions, amino acids and peptides, protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, carbohydrates and carbohydrate metabolism.

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BIOL 471 - Biochemistry II

This course is a continuation of BIOL 470. The topics covered include electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, lipids and lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleic acids and their metabolism, photosynthesis, the chemical structure of genes and chromosomes, protein synthesis, and the structure and function of biological membranes.

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BIOL 474 - Chemistry of Ecological Relationships

An introduction to the chemical basis and mechanisms fundamental to the interaction between organisms. Topics included are: plant biochemical adaptation to the environment, chemistry of pollination, plant toxins, hormonal interactions between plants and animals, chemical basis for insect feeding preferences and vertebrate feeding preferences, animal pheromones, and chemical interactions between plants.

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BIOL 478 - Modeling In Biology

An introduction to techniques and software programs used to model biological, chemical, physical or environmental phenomena. Laboratory work will be tailored to students' interests and needs.

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BIOL 480 - History and Theory of Biology

The history of biology from early times to the present. Ideas influencing the study of biological phenomena, and the effects of biological developments upon human ideas and culture are discussed.

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BIOL 486 - Evolutionary Biology

Exploration of evolutionary processes, including the theoretical and experimental basis for the evolution of organisms. A survey of the fossil record, population genetics, variation, natural selection, adaptation and the mechanisms of species formation. Special attention will be given to the history of evolutionary theory and its place in biology.

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BIOL 494 - Senior Independent Project

In this course students conduct an independent project, designed in consultation with the instructor. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University, a cooperative project with a public agency, or a biological literature research project. Other ventures are possible. Before the work commences, the student is required to submit a detailed proposal. Upon completion of the project, the results must be presented in the form of a paper and a seminar.

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BIOL 495 - Biology Seminar

A weekly seminar through the winter term, exploring the contexts for the discipline of biology, including historical, methodological, ethical and societal dimensions, as well as current biological topics of interest in basic research, industrial and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for biologists in industrial, research and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between biology and society. Students, faculty and visiting speakers will give presentations. This course will meet concurrently with BIOL 395, and from time to time with CHEM 395/495. It is required for fourth-year biology majors. Mark for the course will be pass/fail.

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BIOL 497 - Senior Thesis

Independent full-year research project carried out under the mentorship of a faculty member. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University or a cooperative project with another laboratory or agency. Upon completion of the project, the results are presented in the form of a senior thesis and a seminar. The BIOL 497 thesis research can also be carried out in a summer of full-time research work at The King's University laboratories or as an intern.

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BIOL 499 - Directed Studies In Biology


CHEM 200 - Introductory Chemistry I

This course provides a general introduction to the nature and vocabulary of chemistry, followed by a survey of current chemical models of bonding, structure and reactivity. The course introduces chemistry in contexts that are important to you as a student, and to our planet. Topics include chemical stoichiometry, the gaseous, liquid and solid states, atomic and molecular structure, molecular stability and reactivity, and the electronic structure of atoms.

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CHEM 201 - Introductory Chemistry II

This course teaches students to see the connection between chemistry concepts and the way humanity uses chemistry to change the world. The course begins with a discussion of the models that chemists use to describe bonding. This is followed by a study of thermodynamic equilibria, including solubility, and acid and base chemistry. The importance of redox chemistry and thermodynamic energy are explored followed by a discussion of reaction kinetics.

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CHEM 290 - Concepts of Chemistry

A survey of fundamental concepts central to chemistry, with emphasis on demonstrating the importance of chemical phenomena to the everyday experiences of the student. Examples will be drawn from the chemistry of the environment, the marketplace and living systems.

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CHEM 311 - Analytical Chemistry I

This course focuses on the fundamental chemistry underlying quantitative analysis. Particular emphasis is given to the response of a chemical system at equilibrium to changes in various parameters and to the proper collection and treatment of analytical data. The focus in the laboratory is on gravimetric and volumetric techniques.

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CHEM 312 - Analytical Chemistry II (formerly CHEM 310)

This introduction to quantitative analytical chemistry particularly emphasizes the modern instrumental techniques of spectroscopy and chromatography important to both chemistry and biochemistry. Spectrophotometry, solvent extraction, liquid chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-chromatography, and potentiometry utilizing ion-selective electrodes are among the methods studied. An introduction to questions of precision, accuracy and sampling will also be given.

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CHEM 341 - Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

This course is an introduction to inorganic chemistry. The course starts with a discussion of the origin of the elements and formation of simple molecules. The chemistry of both main group and transition metals are explored by focusing on theories of structure, bonding, and the properties of organometallic complexes and non-molecular solids. The course will pay special attention to the way inorganic chemistry is important for alternative energy and bioinorganic chemistry.

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CHEM 350 - Organic Chemistry I

The chemistry of carbon compounds. Structure-reactivity relationships, mechanism, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy are emphasized in the study of the main classes of organic compounds. Particular attention is paid to compounds of importance to biology and the chemical industry.

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CHEM 351 - Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 350.

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CHEM 370 - Energetics and Chemical Reactions

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the energetics and rates of reactions. Key topics include macroscopic thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, and kinetics.

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CHEM 371 - Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy

This course focusses on developing a quantum mechanical understanding of chemistry. Quantum mechanical models are developed and applied to help students understand rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, and bonding. The connection to quantum chemical calculations is explored. NMR spectroscopy is also discussed from a quantum mechanical perspective.

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CHEM 395 - Chemistry Seminar

A weekly seminar through the entire academic year, exploring the contexts for the discipline of chemistry, including historical, methodological, ethical and societal dimensions, as well as current chemical topics of interest in basic research, industrial and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for chemists in industrial, research and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between chemistry and society. Students, faculty and visiting speakers will give presentations. This course will meet concurrently with CHEM 495, and from time to time with BIOL 395/495. It is required for third-year chemistry majors. First and second year students are strongly encouraged to attend presentations.

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CHEM 399 - Special Topics in Chemistry

A course on a topic or figure of special interest to a member of the chemistry faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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CHEM 400 - Biochemistry I

This course is designed to introduce students to biochemistry. The focus of the lectures is on the structure and function of the chemical constituents of living organisms. The lectures cover such topics as the energetics of biochemical reactions, amino acids and peptides, protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, carbohydrates and carbohydrate metabolism.

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CHEM 401 - Biochemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHEM 400. The topics covered include electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, lipids and lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, nucleic acids and their metabolism, photosynthesis, the chemical structure of genes and chromosomes, protein synthesis, and the structure and function of biological membranes.

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CHEM 440 - Environmental Chemistry (Atmosphere/Environmental Organic)

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of the environment and chemical toxicology. A study of chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, natural and wastewaters, and soils. Mechanisms for the introduction of pollutants to the environment and methods for the removal of pollutants are studied. The focus is on anthropogenic sources of pollutants and their speciation, transport, and interaction with natural processes.

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CHEM 441 - Environmental Chemistry (Soils/Water/Waste)

This course is an introduction to the chemistry of the environment with an emphasis on water, soil and waste. Natural and contaminated surface and ground water will be covered as well as oceans. Soil chemistry will include a discussion of the chemical and physical properties of soil and will include discussion of the fate of and transport of both inorganic and organic pollutants. Chemical aspects of the generation, fate and disposal of wastes including domestic, industrial and nuclear will also be included.

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CHEM 442 - Industrial Chemistry

An introduction to the major industrial chemical processes and chemicals. Emphasis will be given to processes and chemicals important in western Canada such as: heavy inorganic chemicals, petrochemical, forestry, agricultural, metallurgical, electronics and polymer industries. Resource persons from industrial research and development departments will participate extensively in the course and field trips to various facilities will be included.

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CHEM 445 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course explores the structure, bonding, and reactivity of main group and transition metal compounds based on an understanding of molecular symmetry and molecular orbital theory. It also introduces more detailed descriptions of the reactivity of transition metal complexes and their role in catalysis.

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CHEM 450 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

The correlation between structure and reactivity of complex organic molecules is studied through reaction mechanisms. Concepts important to theoretical organic chemistry are introduced and applied. Laboratories focus on synthetic organic chemistry and physical organic techniques. Microscale organic techniques are utilized in the laboratory, as well as computer modelling of organic structures.

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CHEM 460 - Synthesis, Purification, and Characterization

An advanced, integrated laboratory course utilizing synthetic methods from organic, inorganic and biochemistry. Students will perform a series of multi-step syntheses, followed by product purification and characterization, using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods extensively. Synthetic techniques will include solid-phase synthesis and work with air-sensitive materials.

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CHEM 494 - Senior Independent Project

In this course students conduct an independent project, designed in consultation with the instructor. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University, a cooperative project with a public agency, or a chemical literature research project. Other ventures are possible. Before the work commences, the student is required to submit a detailed proposal. Upon completion of the project, the results must be presented in the form of a paper and a seminar.

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CHEM 495 - Chemistry Seminar

A weekly seminar through the entire academic year, exploring the contexts for the discipline of chemistry, including historical, methodological, ethical and societal dimensions, as well as current chemical topics of interest in basic research, industrial and environmental settings. Ethical and professional responsibilities for chemists in industrial, research and academic settings will be addressed, as well as other topics that explore the interface between chemistry and society. Students, faculty and visiting speakers will give presentations. This course will meet concurrently with CHEM 395, and from time to time with BIOL 395/495. It is required for fourth-year chemistry majors. First and second year students are strongly encouraged to attend presentations.

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CHEM 497 - Senior Thesis

Independent full-year research project, carried out under the mentorship of a faculty member. This project may be an independent research project in the laboratories at the University or a cooperative project with another laboratory or agency. Upon completion of the project, the results are presented in the form of a senior thesis and a seminar. The CHEM 497 thesis research can also be carried out in a summer of full-time research work at The King's University laboratories or as an intern.

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CHEM 499 - Directed Studies In Chemistry


CMPT 250 - Introduction to Computing Science

An overview of computing concepts and technologies. Topics include: the history of computing, computing hardware, operating systems, application software, networks, and a discussion of the role of computing and information technologies in society.

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CMPT 275 - Introduction to Programming and Problem-Solving

An introduction to programming and a high-level, object-oriented programming language. Emphasis will be on programming as a problem-solving process which includes analysis, design, coding, testing, implementation and maintenance. Topics include: structured programming, modular design, data objects, variables, assignment, selection, iteration, procedures and functions, arrays and records. Object-oriented programming will be introduced. This course is open to first year students in the Computing Science program.

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CMPT 276 - Data Structures (formerly CMPT 302)

The objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of programming data structures, including how to select and design data structures that are appropriate for particular applications. Topics include stacks, queues, lists, trees, search trees, graphs, and sets. This course provides a mixture of theoretical knowledge and practical experience. The study of data structures and algorithms is carried out within an object-oriented framework and programming language.

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CMPT 304 - Web-Application Design (formerly CMPT 260)

This course introduces client-side and server-side development for creating modern Web-applications. Client-side development topics include HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and JavaScript libraries. Server-side topics include backend processing including input parsing and sanitation, developing asynchronous Web architectures using AJAX, and simple interactions with external data sources such as databases. Social issues related to Internet applications will be presented.

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CMPT 305 - Object-Oriented Programming

This course will further develop object-oriented analysis, design and programming. Topics include: objects, classes, constructors, methods, messages, parameters, inheritance, interfaces, encapsulation, polymorphism, and reuse. A large-scale object oriented example will be presented.

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CMPT 310 - Database Management Systems

A study of the structures and implementations of database management systems. Topics include: data models, normal forms for data relations, data description languages and query facilities.

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CMPT 315 - Real Time Animation and Game Design

The objective of this course is to introduce the programming tools and techniques for creating interactive games and virtual reality simulations, and will focus primarily on programming aspects, including event loops and execution threads, rendering and animation in 3D, and multi-user games and networking. Other topics will include the history of computer/video game technology, game genres and design principles, and the social impact of games.

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CMPT 320 - Software Engineering

An experiential introduction to the software development process. Students will work in software development teams to deliver a semester-long software project. Through the completion of the project students are immersed in a modern software engineering environment and are required to develop strong technical and interpersonal skills. Software engineering topics include: the software lifecycle, requirements specification, object-oriented design and analysis, design patterns, verification and maintenance, environments and engineering tools, human-computer interface, social and ethical issues.

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CMPT 330 - Concepts of Operating Systems

An overview of the major concepts of operating systems. Students will be introduced to the major components of operating systems through lectures and laboratory exercises. Operating system topics include: historical aspects of operating systems development, systems programming, process scheduling, synchronization of concurrent processes, virtual machines, memory management and virtual memory, I/O and file systems.

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CMPT 340 - Programming Language Concepts

This course provides a thorough examination of programming language design and implementation. Topics include language-provided data structuring and data-typing, modularity, scoping, and concurrency. Specific topics include: an overview of interpreters including lexing parsing, Lambda calculus, functional languages, formal semantics and interpreters.

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CMPT 350 - Computer Architecture

A study of the basic principles and issues of computer organization and architecture. Topics include: the Von Neumann architecture, CISC and RISC architectures, one and two pass assemblers, loaders and linkers, macro-processors, compilers, interpreters and operating systems.

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CMPT 360 - Discrete Mathematics

An introduction to formal logical reasoning and mathematical theory in computing science. Topics include: fundamental logic, set theory, induction, relations and functions, graphs, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, generating functions and recurrence.

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CMPT 370 - Algorithm Analysis

Introduction to algorithm analysis, asymptotic notation, and different types of algorithmic techniques (divide and conquer, greedy methods, dynamic programming, backtracking and local search methods), fundamental algorithms for searching and sorting, merging, hashing and graphing. Analysis techniques to estimate program efficiency will also be considered.

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CMPT 375 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

This course introduces students to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) focusing on game playing, constraint satisfaction problems, and uncertain reasoning. AI algorithms enable computers to compete with humans in games such as Chess, Checkers, and Go. Constraint satisfaction problems search large solution spaces for answers meeting requirements.Uncertain reasoning enables inferences using incomplete knowledge. Throughout the course students will reflect on the relationship between human intelligence and artificial intelligence.

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CMPT 399 - Special Topics in Computing Science

A course on a topic or figure of special interest to a member of the computing science faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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CMPT 400 - Computer Networks

An overview of the field of computer networking. Topics include architecture, layering, multiplexing, addressing and address mapping, routing, naming, network software development, distributed systems, security and the Internet.

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CMPT 405 - Software Testing and Security

This course addresses problems and solutions for long-term software maintenance and evolution, and for large-scale, long-lived software systems. Topics include software engineering techniques for large-scale projects, commercial-grade software testing of complex projects, legacy software systems, software evolution, software maintenance, re-use and programming efficiencies, computer systems and security from a development perspective. The social and professional issues that arise in the context of software engineering will be discussed.

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CMPT 420 - Numerical Analysis

An introduction to numerical computation. Topics include computer arithmetic, root approximation, interpolation, numerical integration, applications to differential equations, and error analysis.

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CMPT 430 - Theory of Computing

An introduction into advanced topics in the theory of computation. Topics include: models of computers including finite automata and Turing machines, computability, computational complexity, basics of formal languages.

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CMPT 450 - Image Processing

This course introduces the topic of image processing, including algorithms and data structures for creating, storing, and modifying images. Topics include operations on binary images, image resizing, convolutions, image filters, segmentations, and basic classification techniques. Social issues related to image alteration will be discussed.

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CMPT 460 - Cryptography

This course introduces the mathematical algorithms that are used in cryptography. This includes historic cryptography such as the Caesar and Vigenere ciphers, and the German enigma machine. The majority of the course will focus on modern, public key cryptography: the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, RSA, and elliptic curve cryptography. Students will also learn the mathematics used in these algorithms, which includes modular arithmetic, Euler's phi function, introductory information on elliptic curves, and the definitions of groups, rings and fields. The lab component explores prime detection and factorization algorithms, and the implementation of ciphers.

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CMPT 470 - Perspectives in Computing Science

A senior level seminar course dealing with special topics in computing. Particular attention will be paid to computer applications, social impacts, ethical and legal issues, worldview perspectives and potential future developments in computing.

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CMPT 480 - Practicum I

This is a placement of 10 hours per week in a commercial, industrial or non-profit setting under the supervision of a computing professional. One of CMPT 480 and 481 must be in the non-profit sector. The intern will be expected to maintain a reflective journal and complete a summary paper.

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CMPT 481 - Practicum II

The second practicum placement. The requirements for this course are the same as for CMPT 480.

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CMPT 496 - Research in Computing Science

An independent project in computing science, designed in consultation with the instructor. This project may be either a software development project or a computing literature research project. Before work commences, the student is required to submit a detailed proposal. Upon completion of the project, the results are presented in the form of either a fully documented program or a research paper, and a seminar.

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CMPT 499 - Directed Studies in Computing Science

An opportunity to do advanced study of a special topic of particular interest to a student. Students work with a member of the computing science faculty. Students must apply in advance to a member of the computing science faculty.

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KINS 205 - Introduction to Soccer

This course includes instruction in outdoor soccer, indoor soccer and futsol. Content focuses on the theory and practice of the fundamental skills with an overview of history, strategies, training rules and regulations. Emphasis is divided equally between skill acquisition and the pedagogy of skills as required by the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).

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KINS 207 - Human Anatomy

This introductory survey course of general human morphology is designed to provide students with a systematic description of the anatomical structures of the human body. This includes gross and microscopic anatomy of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Labs include various dissections and in-depth examination of the musculoskeletal system with specific attention to the upper and lower extremities,articulations, and surface anatomy. Critical thinking and appreciation for health and disease from a gross anatomical perspective are emphasized.

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KINS 210 - Social Dance

This course introduces students to individual and partner dances which include a variety of dance forms such as modern, social , jazz and folk. The focus of the course will be on the aesthetic, expressive and rhythmical dimensions of movement with an emphasis on performing and teaching movement content, techniques, improvisation and composition.

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KINS 211 - Introduction to Basketball

This course includes basic instruction in basketball. Content will include the theory and practice of the fundamental skills with an overview of history, strategies, training rules and regulations. Emphasis is divided equally between skill acquisition and the pedagogy of skills as required by the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).

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KINS 216 - Introduction to Volleyball

This course includes basic instruction in volleyball. Content will include the theory and practice of the fundamental skills with an overview of history, strategies, training rules and regulations. Emphasis is divided equally between skill acquisition and the pedagogy of skills as required by the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).

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KINS 222 - Strength Training and Conditioning

This course in intended as an introduction to the basic principles of strength training and cardiovascular conditioning. Emphasis is placed on fitness testing and evaluation, training techniques, program design, methods of training and implementation. Students will learn to administer and interpret fitness assessments, develop training programs, and monitor training.

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KINS 223 - Introduction to Martial Arts

This course offers basic elementary instruction in the martial arts. Content will vary based on the style practiced by the instructor. The focus of the course will be on the theory and practice of the fundamental skills of the martial arts. Emphasis will be placed on participation and skill acquisition with an overview of basic movement strategies and principles of training. Certification and progression to a yellow belt/sash are attainable. (Note: The purchase of a traditional outfit of the style practiced by the instructor is recommended but not required.)

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KINS 237 - Introduction to Badminton

This course includes basic instruction in badminton. Content will include the theory and practice of the fundamental skills with an overview of history, strategies, training rules and regulations. Emphasis is divided equally between skill acquisition and the pedagogy skills as required by the National Coaching Certification program (NCCP).

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KINS 250 - Introduction to Kinesiology

Introductory course which examines the study of human movement from various perspectives including exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, sport psychology, ethics, history and sociology. Students will explore how knowledge, theory and application relate to physical activity and sport from a Christian perspective. Specific attention will be given to the integration of critical thinking, leadership development and how contemporary concepts and trends about sports impacts our views of the world, both locally and globally. This course also includes a review of kinesiology based career options.

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KINS 255 - Personal Physical Fitness and Wellness

This introductory course examines many of the determinants of total wellness and is intended to assist students in developing an awareness of lifestyle issues, to provide them with information about a positive, healthy lifestyle and ultimately to encourage them to adopt healthy practices. Emphasis will be placed upon knowing and understanding basic concepts of fitness, nutrition, elementary first-aid, stress and disease control and applying these in the lab. A holistic approach will provide students with a deeper understanding of their responsibility for personal wellness as part of God's creation.

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KINS 300 - Fundamentals of Coaching

Introduction to the multifaceted field of coaching sports and physical activities. Topics include motivation and communication, skill analysis, training, ethics and sport management.

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KINS 305 - Advanced Soccer

This course includes intermediate to advance instruction in soccer and futsal. Content will include the theory and practice of advanced skills with an in depth look at the history, strategies, training rules and regulations of the sport. Emphasis is divided equally between skill acquisition and the pedagogy of skills as required by the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).

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KINS 307 - Human Physiology I

A introductory study of human physiology. This course examines the human physiological systems which are the basis of normal body function and homeostasis. Topics include chemical and cellular composition of the body, genetic control, cellular respiration and metabolism, nervous system and sensory physiological function.

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KINS 308 - Human Physiology II

Course in development.

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KINS 318 - Exercise Physiology

Course in development.

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KINS 335 - Biomechanics

Course in development.

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KINS 338 - Psychology of Sport and Exercise

This course is designed to introduce students to the relationship between psychological factors and sport and physical activity. There will be two main themes of this course:How psychological factors influence performance and experience in sport and physical activity and how sport and exercise influence psychological well-being. Students will learn to apply sport psychology theories to real situations such as coaching, sports medicine, physical education, health promotion, and training.

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KINS 348 - Socio-cultural Aspects of Sport

This course examines how socio-cultural factors influence sport, and how sport has become a socializing agent of society and culture. Historical and sociological dimensions are explored. Aspects include the industry of sport, gender and sport, ethics and sport, and sport phenomena such as the Olympics.

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KINS 351 - Growth and Development

Course in development.

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KINS 375 - Sport and Recreation Management

This course provides an overview of the basic management principles as they relate to sport enterprises and the operation of sport and recreation organizations. Functional areas of management will be highlighted including finance, marketing, human resources, and ethics. Students will explore the nature of recreation and sport from a Christian world view with an emphasis on developing effective leadership skills. Current trends and challenges in sport and recreation will also be addressed.

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KINS 385 - Athletics Internship

Placement of a student with a sports organization for work experience. The practicum is designed by the student, supervising faculty member, and the supervising organizational director. Course work may include weekend seminars and certification in a specific sport or sports related training.

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KINS 393 - Movement Activities for Children

Students will study movement activities for children in elementary school within a developmental framework. Special emphasis is placed on games, gymnastics and dance for children ages five to twelve years. The course combines theory, practical teaching experiences with children and critical reflection on these experiences in the context of children's physical development. This will include the study of free play and organized physical activities in recreational, educational, and sport environments.

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KINS 395 - Leadership

This course includes an overview of the various approaches to leadership theory, including trait-based, skills-based, situational, contingency, path-goal, leader-member exchange, transformational and servant leadership, and others. Leadership issues examined include: leadership development, roles of followers, management vs leadership, personality, faith perspectives, personal values, group status and dynamics.

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KINS 396 - Health Psychology

In this course students will examine theoretical explanations and empirical evidence concerning the influence of psychological factors on health and illness. Students will learn about clinical practice in the field of health psychology and learn how to approach assessment and intervention with knowledge of the biological,psychological, social, and spiritual factors that interact to influence health and illness. Topics of study will include an introduction and brief history of health psychology and three primary modules: stress, illness and coping, health behavior change and health promotion and the management of chronic and life-threatening illness.

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KINS 399 - Special Topics in Kinesiology

A course on a topic or figure of special interest and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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KINS 427 - Physiology of the Cardiovascular System

Course in development.

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MATH 200 - Introductory Calculus I

Mathematics is a language that numerically describes and shapes our world. The course introduces analytic geometry; functions, limits, derivatives, and applications; integration and applications. A major goal is to understand the behaviour of functions as mathematical models in the natural sciences, including population dynamics in biology and Newtonian mechanics in physics.

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MATH 205 - Introductory Calculus II

Mathematics is a language that numerically describes and shapes our world. The course presents Transcendental and hyperbolic functions; methods of integration; sequences, series and applications. The course deepens the understand of functions as mathematical models in the natural sciences, specifically focusing on probably models for statistics and the use of infinite series in the algorithms of computing science.

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MATH 221 - Linear Algebra I

Mathematics is a language that numerically describes and shapes our world. The course is an introduction to linear algebra including solving linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces and linear transformations. A major goal is to introduce the use and importance of linear algebra models in the natural sciences, including Leslie matrices in biology and stochastic models in statistics.

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MATH 281 - Principles of Mathematics for Teaching

This course provides a study of foundational mathematical concepts and properties in the elementary and junior high curriculum. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding, reasoning, explaining why algorithms work, and problem solving. Topics include number systems, operations, fractional numbers, proportional reasoning, and aspects of geometry.

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MATH 282 - Mathematical Reasoning for Teaching

This course explores the mathematical reasoning embedded in concepts encountered in the upper elementary and junior high curriculum. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding, reasoning, explaining why algorithms work, and problem solving. The content follows sequentially from Math 281. Topics include proportional reasoning, number theory, algebraic reasoning and aspects of geometry and probability.

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MATH 300 - Intermediate Calculus I

Series, power series and applications. Plane curves, polar coordinates and three dimensional analytic geometry. Partial differentiation and Lagrange multipliers.

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MATH 305 - Intermediate Calculus II

Multiple integrals, integrals in rectangular and polar coordinates. Introduction to vector calculus and Gauss', Green's and Stoke's theorems. Introduction to first- and second-order linear differential equations with applications.

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MATH 360 - Discrete Mathematics

An introduction to formal logical reasoning and mathematical theory in computing science. Topics include: fundamental logic, set theory, induction, relations and functions, graphs, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, generating functions and recurrence.

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MATH 399 - Special Topics in Mathematics

A course on a topic or field of special interest to a member of the mathematics faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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MATH 420 - Numerical Analysis

An introduction to numerical computation. Topics include computer arithmetic, root approximation, interpolation, numerical integration, applications to differential equations, and error analysis.

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MATH 430 - Theory of Computing

An introduction into advanced topics in the theory of computation. Topics include: models of computers including finite automata and Turing machines, computability, computational complexity, basics of formal languages.

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MATH 434 - Differential Equations

First, second, and higher order ordinary differential equations; power series methods of solution; Laplace transforms; linear systems of equations; numerical methods of solution. Applications to the physical sciences will be emphasized.

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MATH 448 - Complex Analysis

An introduction to complex analysis. The course will cover properties of the complex plane, differentiation and integration with complex variables, Cauchy's Theorem, Taylor series, Laurent series, poles and residues.

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MATH 460 - Cryptography

This course introduces the mathematical algorithms that are used in cryptography. This includes historic cryptography such as the Caesar and Vigenere ciphers, and the German enigma machine. The majority of the course will focus on modern, public key cryptography: the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, RSA, and elliptic curve cryptography. Students will also learn the mathematics used in these algorithms, which includes modular arithmetic, Euler's phi function, introductory information on elliptic curves, and the definitions of groups, rings and fields. The lab component explores prime detection and factorization algorithms, and the implementation of ciphers.

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MATH 499 - Directed Studies in Mathematics

An opportunity to do advanced study of a special topic of particular interest to a student. Students work with a member of the mathematics faculty. Students must apply in advance to a member of the mathematics faculty.

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PHYS 241 - Mechanics

Kinematics, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies.

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PHYS 243 - Wave Motion and Electricity

A calculus based course concerned with gravitational fields and potentials, oscillations and wave motion including an introduction to Wave Mechanics and Quantum Theory.

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PHYS 300 - Introduction to Electromagnetism and Physical Optics

A first course in electricity and magnetism with emphasis on the electric and magnetic properties of matter, development of the Biot-Savart Law, Ampere's Law and the laws of magnetic induction. Course will introduce Maxwell's equations and conclude with an application of these ideas to physical optics. The rudimentary ideas of vector calculus will be developed in the weekly seminar accompanying this course.

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PHYS 395 - God, Physics and the Human Prospect

This course is intended for students in their senior year of study and will focus on the dialogue between scientific and other ways of knowing. Topics will be drawn from Physics, Theology and Sociology that will illuminate such motivating questions as 1) How can Science and Theology engage in a conversation of mutual understanding and transformation? 2) How, or in what ways, has science changed our ideas about what it means to be human? and 3) Given these changes, how then ought we to live our lives?

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PHYS 399 - Special Topics In Physics

A course on a topic or figure of special interest to a member of the physics faculty and offered on a non-recurring basis.

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PHYS 499 - Directed Studies in Physics

This course gives an opportunity to do intensive study of some area of physics of particular interest to the student. Students work closely with a member of the physics faculty in tutorials. Students must apply in advance for directed studies to the faculty member involved.

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STAT 300 - Introduction to Statistics

An introduction to the use of statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, regression and correlation, inference on means and proportions, sampling distributions, analysis of variance, hypothesis testing.

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